In this tutorial, user eerielinux shows us how to set up a BSD home router with pfSense and OPNsense, both open-source router/firewall OS based on FreeBSD. Follow the links below for each part of the 8 part tutorial series.

Part 1 of this article series was about why you want to build your own router, and how to assemble the APU2 that I chose as the hardware to build this on. Part 2 gave some Unix history and explained what a serial console is. Part 3 demonstrated serial access to the APU and showed how to update its firmware.

This post is about the serial installation of pfSense, one of two FreeBSD-based router/firewall operating systems that we’re going to explore in this series (the other being OPNsense). As pfSense is the older and more established product, we’re beginning with that one.

Building a BSD home router (pt. 4): Installing pfSense

This post will show how to install OPNsense, a great alternative to pfSense.

Preparation

OPNsense was forked from pfSense (more on than in the next post) and thus you will find lots of similarities if you have read the post on installing pfSense. The OPNsense team decided to move forward more quickly and did lots of interesting but invasive changes. One strong point for example is that it is already based on FreeBSD 11.0. There is one drawback to this, however: a problem with the XHCI (USB3) driver can lead to the installation media not being able to mount the filesystem and boot up. This makes installing OPNsense a little bit more complicated since the APU2 only has UBS3 ports.

Building a BSD home router (pt. 5): Installing OPNsense

A little overview: In this post I will give you some background information, compare the appearance / usability of both products and then take a look at some special features before giving a conclusion.

pfSense vs. OPNsense: Who wins?

This article is about comparing both products and helping you to make a decision. It is not terribly in-depth, because that task would require its own series of articles (and a lot more free time for me to dig much deeper into the topic). But still there’s a lot you may want to know to get a first impression on which one you should probably choose. If you do some more research and write about it, please let me know and I will happily link to your work!

Building a BSD home router (pt. 6): pfSense vs. OPNsense

 

Revisiting the initial question

In the first post I asked the question “Why would you want to build your own router?” and the answer was “because the stock ones are known to totally suck”. I have since stumbled across this news: Mcafee claims: Every router in the US is compromised. Now Mcafee is a rather flamboyant personality and every is a pretty strong statement. But I’m not such a nit-picker and in general he’s definitely right. If you have a couple of minutes, read the article and/or watch the short Youtube interview that it has embedded.

Building a BSD home router (pt. 7): Advanced OPNsense installation

 

Fixing swap

This is the last part of this series of building a BSD home router. In the previous article we did an advanced setup of OPNsense that works but is currently wasting valuable disk space. We also configured OPNsense for SSH access. Now let’s SSH in and su – to root and continue! Choose shell (menu point 8) so that we can have a look around.

Building a BSD home router (pt. 8): ZFS and jails