TrueBSD – ever heard of it?

TrueBSD LogoRecently I came across a fairly new project called TrueBSD, a FreeBSD LiveCD based on XFCE.

There’s not a great deal of information on the TrueBSD website as to what the goals of the project are, how their project differs from FreeSBIE (another FreeSBIE Live CD based on XFCE), if they’re planning to branch off etc etc etc. This is all the info on the frontpage:

“TrueBSD is a LiveCD operating system based on FreeBSD with many useful applications. All oen programs will keep working even when you eject LiveCD (using command cdcontrol eject) in order to get some data from your own CDs. Just don’t forget to insert the LiveCD again before starting any other programs. TrueBSD is distributed under BSD license, but some of the included software can be covered by some other license..

I have emailed the lead developer about a month ago for more information and background regarding TrueBSD, but all I received back was an email saying he doesn’t speak English. I’ve also tried to contact other members of the team, but, unfortunately, no reply (as yet).

So, the main reason for trying to contact members of the TrueBSD team was to find out some more background info and to see if I should track them on this blog etc.

Does any of you guys you know anything about this project? If, so it would be great if you could drop me a line.

DesktopBSD Day 1

Jan Stedehouder has been reviewing PC-BSD for 30 days in September. Now (November) he’s using DesktopBSD for 30 days and writing about his experience on his blog:

  1. DesktopBSD Day 1 – Getting Started (part 1)
  2. DesktopBSD Day 1 – Getting Started (part 2)

The PC-BSD series was well written, balanced and fair. The PC-BSD has been following the series with great interest and have taken the feedback and suggestions to heart. I’m sure the DesktopBSD team will do the same.

A new day, a new month and a new challenge. For the next thirty days I will again plunge into the world of *BSD, this time using DesktopBSD. This is the second “30 days” series. For those who are interested, the first series was about PC-BSD and can be found here. My aim is to write everyday about my experiences with DesktopBSD, the pros and cons, the good and the bad, the smart and the stupid.

FreeNAS 0.686b1 Released

FreeNASToday the release of FreeNAS 0.686b1 has been anounced via the mailinglist. Version o.685RC2 has been skipped because all its improvements and fixes are also included in 0.686b1.

Download here

Majors changes:

  • Upgrade fusefs-ntfs to 1.1004.
  • Upgrade lighttpd to 1.4.18.
  • Upgrade netbsd-iscsi (iscsi-target) to 20070925.
  • Refactor GEOM-Eli implementation + WebGUI. Now it is possible to add existing encrypted disks and change passwords for a encrypted disk.
  • Improve device detection for configuration storage when booting from LiveCD.
  • Update zoneinfo files.
  • Add ‘System/Packages’ WebGUI page to administrate packages (only available in ‘full’ install mode).
  • Add LDAP Authentication.
  • Add email status report.
  • Add ‘Status/Report’ WebGUI page to administrate email status report.
  • Upgrade iSCSI Target to version 20070925.
  • Update ‘iSCSI Target’ WebGUI + services. Now it is possible to expand existing targets and define RAID0 and RAID1 devices. It is also possible to use disk devices as extents.
  • Refactor complete user/group management (code, services & WebGUI).
  • Add scheduled reboot feature.
  • Add ‘System/Advanced/Cron’ WebGUI to administrate additional cron jobs.

[Read more…]

pfSense hackathon wrap up

The third annual pfSense hackathon has been a great success. There was a lot of cleaning up code and cleaning up the many new features that are already in the development branches, rather than adding more new features. This leaves pfSense in a better position to get out future releases.

DesktopBSD weekly snapshots (dev)

The release cycle of DesktopBSD is rather slow, since the developers spend a lot of time making sure the release is almost bug-free. For those who are always excited about trying the latest and greatest features, DBSD provides now weekly snapshot ISOs. They are built every Saturday from the latest DesktopBSD Tools, the most recent FreeBSD 6-STABLE sources and an up-to-date ports collection. The ISO contains a live system that can be booted without installing first, an installer that copies the operating system to your hard disk and a large selection of packages for most of your every-day needs.

For now, the snapshots are only available for the AMD64 architecture, but i386 snapshots will soon folow. You can download the ISO files here.

Source

Low-Cost Storage Tools

The Processor website has published (19/10/2007) an article “Low-Cost Storage Tools – Open-Source Projects Provide Increasing Choices” that gives a short description of the following open source storage tools:

Demands for storage continue to increase, even as the technological complexities of running a data center multiply, leaving IT departments and data center managers in businesses of all sizes looking for assistance in improving efficiencies and reducing management headaches. A growing number of mostly open-source-based storage tools are available for free or for a minimal subscription fee that can help bridge that gap and provide businesses with storage alternatives.

FreeNAS

Designed around a FreeBSD base and backed by an active community, FreeNAS (www.freenas.org) is a mature open-source network-attached storage server. It includes a wide range of protocol support, including CIFS (Samba), FTP (File Transfer Protocol), NFS (Network File System), AFP (Apple Filing Protocol), S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology), local user authentication, and software RAID.

FreeNAS takes less than 32MB to install on CompactFlash, a hard drive, or a USB flash drive. Users can also run FreeNAS from a Live CD, which is an OS distribution executed upon boot without installation on a hard drive. A VMware disk image is also available. It has a full Web configuration interface, and users can download the software at SourceForge.net.

Whole article here