FreeBSD OpenStack, FOSDEM, NetApp, EdgeRouter, Google Cloud Engine and more

Freebsd newsWelcome to the latest (Free)BSD news round-up in which we have a mix of news snippets and links. Just a round-up of those miscellaneous (Free)BSD related links that are newsworthy and which you may find interesting, but are yet too small to package as individual posts.

Some of the links below have already appeared in our Google Plus +FreeBSD Central and Twitter feeds.

FreeBSD on OpenStack
There has not been a complete solution to run FreeBSD instances on OpenStack, until now.
github – 3 Feb 2014

OpenSSH 6.5 has been released
openssh.ort – 30 Jan 2014

Crazed Ferrets in a Berkeley Shower – 2014 edition
Michael Lucas Blog – 29 jan 2014

FOSDEM 2014 Photos
Pictures from the first conference of the year, FOSDEM. Photo credits go to John Hixson from iXsystems.
iXsystems Google+ page – 8 Feb 2014

NetApp and Microsoft: We’re ‘close’ to virtual ONTAP on Azure
The seed for this approach was sown in May 2012, when Microsoft, Citrix and +NetApp announced they would work together to make FreeBSD run as a guest OS under Hyper-V.
The Register – 05 Feb 2014

Time to bid farewell to the old pkg_ tools
Bye bye PKG
freebsdish.org – 3 Feb 2014

Strength of FreeNAS Project Sets iXsystems Apart
Interview with iXsystems CTO Jordan Hubbard
dcig.com – 04 Feb 2014

FreeBSD support in Google Cloud Engine (GCE)
FreeBSD kind of runs on the +Google Cloud Platform,  but there are still a couple of issues, and the process isn’t that straight forward at the moment.

FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems Collaborate to Further the Cause of High Performance Computing on FreeBSD
Remember MEGACORE, the 1TB of RAM beast? Check out how the FreeBSD Foundation plans to use the powerful machine!

FreeBSD Guides
Screencast tutorials about how to get things done with FreeBSD

FreeBSD 10.0 on Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite
The Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite is a neat little device that costs less than US$100, has three Ethernet ports, and can run FreeBSD/mips.

Clang Is Now Self-Hosting On Linux/FreeBSD SPARC64
Thanks to Jakob’s work on Sparcv9 ABI in Clang and recent changes to Sparc code generator
LLVMDev – 02 Feb 2014

FreeBSD Open-Source OS Comes to the PC-BSD Desktop
While FreeBSD itself could potentially be used as a desktop system, the PC-BSD open-source project is the home base for FreeBSD as a desktop operating system. PC-BSD 10, based on FreeBSD 10 at its core, was officially released on Jan. 29.
Eweek.com – 31 Jan 2014

FreeBSD to support secure boot by mid-year
Support for secure boot will be available in the FreeBSD 10.1 release which is due to be made later this year, according to Marshall Kirk McKusick.
itwire.com – 20 Jan 2014

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest 16
Big news this week for the PBI format. Kris has confirmed that a patch has been implemented for the way PBI’s are being built that will shrink the size of PBI’s by approximately 50%.
PC-BSD Blog – 7 Feb 2014

The Daemon and the Penguin, FreeNAS labels, pfSense, PC-BSD updates

Freebsd newsWelcome to the latest (Free)BSD news round-up in which we have a mix of news snippets and links. Just a round-up of those miscellaneous (Free)BSD related links that are news worthy and which you may find hopefully interesting, but are yet too small to package as individual posts.

Some of the links below have already appeared in our Google Plus +FreeBSD Central and Twitter feeds.

PC-BSD 10.0-RC5 Now Available
This will likely be our LAST RC before issuing the 10.0-FINAL release in a week or so.
PC-BSD Blog – 23 Jan 2014

New pfSense website
The pfSense project has a new website

pfSense 2.1.1-PRERELEASE Snapshots available
For those who are inclined to try such things, 2.1.1-PRERELEASE snapshots are up for testing at snapshots.pfsense.org. New features and changes.

Amazon supporting FreeBSD Foundation
When you shop at Amazon through this link, https://smile.amazon.com/ch/84-1545163, Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible Amazon Smile purchases to the FreeBSD Foundation.

FOSDEM 2014 BSD program
The program for the BSD devroom at #FOSDEM 2014 in Brussels is now available.

FreeBSD Programming Primer
BSD Mag has an issue with 12 tutorials on how to develop a Content Management System (CMS) which will run under an AMP stack on FreeBSD, OpenBSD and Linux. In this series Rob Somerville looks at the tools, processes and methods involved in writing a CMS.
BSD Mag – 14 Jan 2014

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest
For those of you waiting for PC-BSD 10 to become a reality, the wait is almost over.
PC-BSD Blog – 24 Jan 2014

The Daemon, the GNU & the Penguin
Peter Salus’s book, the Daemon, the Gnu, and the Penguin, was a regular Groklaw feature in 2005 and 2006. It is now in book form (paperback) and available from Barnes and Noble and Amazon. It’s been expanded, and the subtitle now is “How Free and Open Software is Changing the World”.

iXsystems’ new FreeNAS device needs your label vote
Here’s your chance to influence the design of an upcoming FreeNAS product from iXsystems! Help us pick which label you’d like to see by leaving a comment on this post.
Vote via +iXsystems, Facebook or the FreeNAS forums

FreeBSD 11 has been added to the BSD Family Tree

OpenBSD rescued from unpowered oblivion by $20K bitcoin donation

FreeBSD (based) releases and events – December 2013

This is a quick recap of what happened in the world of FreeBSD in December 2013.

Releases

 

Events and Conferences

 

Magazine and videos

 

Projects

 

Faces, people and new committers

Faces of FreeBSD – 

New committers

  • Ganbold Tsagaankhuu (doc, src)
  • Jonathan Chu (ports)
  • Bryan Drewery (ports, src)

Ports Managers

FreeBSD news and links round-up – week 44

Welcome to the weekly (Free)BSD news round-up (week 44) where we have a mix of news snippets, links, howto’s and software/package updates for you all. These tid-bits are all very interesting and news worthy, yet too small to package as individual posts.

FreeBSD News

A FreeBSD Success Story

… Then, we switched the server to a new one, quad core, sixty gigabytes of ram and two terabytes of disk. This time, I chose FreeBSD because I knew that it would work greatly ! Linux could have worked too, maybe we could have more performance, but it would not be as easy to manage as our FreeBSD box… More

FreeBSD Ports

Bernhard Fröhlich joined the FreeBSD Ports Team in October.

Releases

1. FreeNAS 8.3 User Guide

The FreeNAS 8.3.0 Users Guide is available for download as EPUB, HTML and PDF.

2. M0n0wall 1.34b1 released

Manuel Kasper has announced Beta1 of M0n0wall 1.34.

“A maintenance version in the m0n0wall 1.3 branch has been released: 1.34b1 includes the CSRF-related fixes recently made to the beta branch, as well as a few others security-relevant things. Nothing is high priority, but once 1.34b1 has received some wider testing, it will be re-released as 1.34, and 1.33 users will be recommended to upgrade.”

Software/package updates

1. FreeBSD/Raspberry Pi

Gonzo has mentions that he has moved his FreeBSD/Raspberry Pi project into FreeBSD Head / Current.

2 KNemo 0.7.4 receives major improvements for FreeBSD

KNemo is a tool that monitors the network traffic and provides a tray widget for every network interface, support for network statistics, and different icon themes.

Highlights of the release are:

• Bugs in the BSD backend has been fixed;
• Wrong traffic bug reported on FreeBSD has been repaired;
• Wrong encryption state for mixed WEP connections on FreeBSD has been fixed;
• Default gateway previously undetected on FreeBSD is now working properly;
• A monochrome icon theme has been added;
• Support for the legacy system tray icon has been removed;
• Embedded plotter code has been dropped in favor of libksignalplotter.

Websites / Social Media

As some of you may have seen already RootBSD has a new website. It looks very clean and slick and looks more ‘web 2.0′ than the previous version.

RootBSD was established with one goal in mind: to provide reliable, flexible, and supported BSD-based hosting services to professionals and businesses. Our extensive selection of FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and Linux hosting packages means there is a right package for almost everyone.

(Free)BSD Events

1. PfSense Weekend (Brazil)

There will be a classroom pfSense weekend in Porto Alegre (Brazil) from 14-16 December. More details on http://www.cursopfsense.com.br/

New FreeBSD Committers

In October 2012 the following people became new committers or were given enhanced FreeBSD update rights: Simon J. Gerraty (src), Erwin Lansing (src, ports) and Eitan Adler (src, ports, doc).

BSD / Unix Family News

OpenBSD 5.2 arrives with improved multi-core support.

The OpenBSD project has released version 5.2 of its free BSD-based UNIX-like operating system. According to its developers, the most important change in the new release is the switch from user-level to kernel-level threads. This allows programs with multiple threads to use multiple CPU cores. (via)

Miscelaneous news updates (arab-bsd, pf, cyphertite, PC-BSD)

Below a number of links to interesting FreeBSD (related) projects and resources.

ArabBSD

ArabBSD is a new FreeBSD related project, working to create an Arabian FreeBSD operating system:

ArabBSD is a project which aims to provide infrastructure for the most reliable and secure operating system FreeBSD. We aim to have our own Arab Operating System developers soon starting from the analysis of FreeBSD infrastructure,  block diagram formulation and call for research groups within each field.  Anyone who is interesting in operating systems and their news can join us. They will keep up with OS. OS is about everything in life containing all the types of programming. You can develop in the kernel and you can use this Operating System as a virtual environment for your project.

10 years of pf presentation

Henning Brauer has made his presentation from BSDCan 2011 available. Weighing in at 82 pages, he gives a detailed overview of what happened to the packet filter firewall (pf) in the last 10 years.

Interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD)

PC Perspective‘s John Davis interviewed Kris Moore recently. They talk about PC-BSD’s hardware support, performance, games and the future. The full interview can be read here: Interview with Kris Moore, Founder and Lead Developer at PC-BSD.

There’s also an interview on Distrowatch by Jesse Smith on OS design elements. Jesse interviews Jenny Rosenberg and James Nixon (iXsystems). Read the full interview here:  In the eye of the beholder.

cyphertite

cyphertite is a high-security scalable solution for online backups that can be installed on FreeBSD. The project is looking for testers and feedback. cyphertite features include:

  • client-based system
  • IPv6 support
  • compresses and encrypts all data before transmission
  • deduplicates using fixed-size pieces of data called “chunks”
  • all network traffic is encrypted using openssl certificates and keys
  • realm deduplication i.e. only backs up a file once if it is on N computers that share the same user account
  • incremental backups for shorter backup window and smaller metadata files
  • local cache database of chunks already sent to server avoids unnecessary encryption and network traffic
  • pay according to storage space used, not per client machine
  • demonstrable privacy of client data with open source client

cyphertite.comInstall cyphertiteConfigure cyphertite

The Unix Method of Development Management

This is a mp3 recording of William Baxter’s NYCBUG presentation on The Unix Method of Development Management

Spanish video on PC-BSD

Sergio Ligregnio’s presentation on PC-BSD (in Spanish).


(Free)BSD quick news ‘n links (week 17)

Below some links to some FreeBSD resourses that you guys may be interested in, and other BSD related items I’ve come across.

FreeBSD

  • Chromium 10, Google’s blazingly fast internet browser, is now available in the FreeBSD Ports directory (www/chromium).
  • New FreeBSD Installer test and walkthrough. Michael W. Lucas tests the new FreeBSD installer (bsd install) and gives his feedback (incl screenshots). He likes most of the changes and improvements, but is not altogether happy yet.
  • FreeBSD 8.2-RELEASE Custom XFCE builds available. Download from freebsd-custom.wikidot.com/

DragonFlyBSD

  • DragonFlyBSD 2.10 Released. DFBSD devs have released version 2.10 with better hardware and multiple processor support. The HAMMER file system now supports deduplication.
  • DragonFlyBSD devs are looking for testers to try out the internet browser on DragonFlyBSD (Chromium for DragonFly)

OpenBSD

  • A Puffy in the corporate aquarium. There’s an interesting article on the Undeadly OpenBSD blog of m:tier, a London consultancy that works with Fortune 500 companies to equip them with OpenBSD firewalls, servers and desktops. OpenBSD has a reputation for high security and being a difficult operating system to use for new user, but m:tier helps companies to use for everything:

As a company we are very dedicated to what we do because we are “forced” to use our operating system of choice and we want our customers to be as happy as we are at using it :-)

So our paid job is hacking on and deploying, maintaining, supporting… OpenBSD installations. We are also required to hack on things that can be merged back into OpenBSD itself and when it’s not possible, then we change what we did so that it can be. Of course some developments are very specific to what we do and have no place in the project’s CVS tree.

So, amongst other services, we set up and maintain several 100% OpenBSD-based infrastructures (going from the entry site firewall to the secretary’s workstation) and this is what I’m going to talk about here.  Continues

  • MarBSD-X is a OpenBSD based Live CD with support for X (via)

BSD Certification

The BSD Certification Group (BSDCG) announced today that it has partnered with Schroeder Measurement Technologies (SMT) to increase the geographic availability of BSD certification exams. Through its sister company, Iso-Quality Testing (IQT), SMT maintains a testing center network of carefully selected partners, including college/university testing centers and computer-related businesses to provide testing services in a secure, proctored environment. Testing centers are available in over 300 cities in 19 countries. (full press release)

 

Quick news and links: ghostbsd, pfsense, doing business with BSD

Some links to recent project updates and howtos.

pfSense

GhostBSD

Setting up FreeBSD Wireless

Successful businesses do it with BSD!

The hidden underbelly of Mac OS X is; yep you guessed it BSD. Originally based on OpenBSD however since 10.2 or shortly there after FreeBSD. So this begs the question why do some many manufacturers rally behind Linux when Apple has clearly demonstrated beyond a shadow of any doubt that if you wish to be truly commercially successful building on the back of Open Source you’ve got to do it with a BSD. Consider all of those netbook producers out there with deploying Windows XP in most cases or some flavorless Linux distribution. …. Contintues

Miscelaneous FreeBSD news and links

Below some links to news articles and blogposts relating to FreeBSD, it’s development and future:

1. NeoRouter 1.1.2 released for FreeBSD (via)

NeoRouter is a cross-platform remote access and VPN solution, that helps you manage and connect to all your computers from anywhere. It gracefully integrates Remote Access, File Sharing, Virtual Private Network, User and Access Management.

Advantages:

  • cross-platform and zero-config
  • peer-to-peer (P2P) connection
  • Roaming user profile
  • built-in ACL and firewall
  • free

2. HOWTO: FreeBSD Binary Upgrade (base system + packages)

FreeBSD power user Vermaden has created an easy to follow howto enabling you to easily upgrade your FreeBSD base system and packages: FreeBSD Binary Upgrade

3. OpenJDK6 IcedTea Java plugin for FreeBSD

Request for help and testing:

Due to a lot of user request I’ve started working on a port for the OpenJDK6 IcedTea Java plugin which works with Firefox 3.6. As I never used the Java plugin and I’m not very experienced in the Java world I need some help.

Some parts of the port are taken from java/openjdk6 and pkgsrc

Source: OpenJDK6 IcedTea Java plugin for FreeBSD

4. Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Becomes More Interesting

Phoronix looks at Debian GNU/kFreeBSD again:

Since last year we have been talking about Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, one of the official ports for Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” that will bring a 32-bit and 64-bit FreeBSD kernel as an option to using the Linux kernel. Debain GNU/kFreeBSD still has the Debian user-land complete with its massive package repository and apt-get support, but the FreeBSD kernel is running underneath instead of Linux. Debian GNU/kFreeBSD has matured a lot over the past year and most recently it has switched to using the FreeBSD 8.1 kernel by default and also now supports ZFS file-systems.

In January of this year was our first time benchmarking Debian GNU/kFreeBSD when it was using the FreeBSD 7.2 kernel. With that initial testing, in 18 of our 27 benchmarks Debian GNU/Linux was still faster than Debian GNU/kFreeBSD. We delivered a much larger comparison a week later when comparing the Debian variant to Fedora, FreeBSD 7.2/8.0, OpenBSD, and OpenSolaris. Debian GNU/kFreeBSD performed about average.

[…]

Debian GNU/kFreeBSD though has continued advancing since that point. When trying out the latest daily installer image of Debian GNU/kFreeBSD this week, there is not only the FreeBSD 8.1 kernel available, but it’s now used by default. This Debian port is no longer using a Debian 7.x kernel by default but it’s moved up to match the latest upstream FreeBSD stable release that’s available.

[…]

Not only is Debian GNU/kFreeBSD more exciting for its new default kernel, but now it has ZFS file-system support too. Added to the kFreeBSD repository recently was a zfsutils package that provides the support for using and setting up ZFS file-systems.

Source: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Becomes More Interesting

5. Glibc finally free software

Glibc is now free under the BSD license:

Fedora Engineering Manager Tom ‘spot’ Callaway has announced that glibc , the GNU C Library, is finally free software after working with Oracle to get Sun code from 1985 placed under an unrestricted licence. Glibc is typically included with most programs that are compiled with the GNU C compiler…. more

6. FreeBSD Nvidia driver 256.53 available

You can download the latest Nvidia graphics card drivers from FreeBSD direct from the NVidia website

7. Microsoft Patents Operating System Shutdown

How rediculous is this:

“Microsoft just received confirmation of a patent that hands the company the intellectual property of shutting an operating system down.” (continues)

What do you think. Will this have any implications for FreeBSD?

8. NetApp and Oracle lift ZFS patent cloud
A long running legal battle between NetApp and Sun Microsystems, which centered on the open source ZFS filesystem, has come to an end. NetApp has announced that it has agreed with Oracle to dismiss patent litigation.

More

9. Latest Version of BSD Certification DVD Available (via)

The latest version of the BSD Certification Study DVD is now available. Besides being a handy study reference, the DVD is a useful tool as it contains the latest versions of the 4 BSDs plus their documentation.

Full Announcement

Miscelaneous FreeBSD news and links (week 32)

1. FreeBSD East Coast Mirror

Yesterday we posted the FreeBSD Foundation’s turns to NYI press release, Steven Kreuzer who was directly involved in the project has put more details on his website:

Pretty much since the time that The NYC BSD Users Group was formed, The NY Internet Company have donated a full cabinet and a 10 Mb internet connection to NYCBUG. We used that space to host our website and mailing lists, hardware for developers and mirrors for all the major BSD projects.

In October of 2009, I received an email inviting me to a grand opening party at NYI’s new state of the art data center located in Bridgewater, NJ. I asked some folks on core@ if they thought it would be worthwhile to approach NYI to see if they would be willing to donate a few cabinets so we could build out a FreeBSD mirror on the east coast. gnnjhb and I had a very informal meeting with Phil from NYI and after asking him if they would be willing to provide us with a few cabinets, some power and bandwidth, without thought or hesitation he said yes. The possibility of putting a mirror of FreeBSD.org on the east coast quickly became possible.

Continues: East Coast FreeBSD Mirror

2. FreeBSD VirtualBox Image for Port Maintainers

This website provides 64bit VirtualBox Images for FreeBSD Port Maintainers with some common used software pre-installed.

3. 10 Differences between Linux and BSD

  • Licenses
  • Control
  • Kernel vs operating system
  • UNIX/like
  • Base systems
  • More from source
  • Upgrades
  • Bleeding edge
  • Hardware support
  • User base

Full post: 10 differences between Linux and BSD (techrepublic.com)

4. Open Source projects that changed the world

FreeBSD is one of them: Open source projects that changed the world (ostatic.com)

5. BSDCan through the years

Kirk Russell has posted a summary of BSDCan through the years on the Google Open Source Blog.

I’m Kirk Russell, a Google Site Reliability Engineer who moves files around the cloud at a massive scale. I use BSD software on a daily basis — in my Android phone, my home NAS and my MacBook. My newest toy is a small ARM board that runs FreeBSD.

Earlier this year I attended BSDCan, a software conference for BSD based operating systemprojects. I attended this conference to learn about new BSD technology that will someday become part of my daily life and to meet people with similar interests — there is time to chat in-between the scheduled talks and in the pub. BSDCan is a conference where I learn about new development that I can put to use both at work and at home. Learning these things from the original developers makes it that much more interesting.

Here is a quick reflection on some highlights of past conferences:

BSDCan through the years

(Free)BSD quick news and links (week 16)

Welcome to the (Free)BSD leftovers for week 6. In this post we have a mix of news snippets, quick links, howto’s, links ’n software/package updates. Just a round up of those little things I saved up this week. Previous weeks’ roundups can be found here.

FreeBSD News

  1. FreeBSD & Google Summer of Code 2010
    FreeBSD Project is participating in Google’s Summer of Code programme for a sixth year. Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to apply for a grant to spend the summer improving the FreeBSD operating system! More information available on the FreeBSD Summer of code page.
    Students may now apply to participate at http://socghop.appspot.com/. Before applying you may wish to discuss your project ideas on the freebsd-hackers mailing list or on the #freebsd-soc IRC channel on EFNet. Project ideas can be found at: http://www.freebsd.org/projects/summerofcode.html
  2. Have you ever expressed your gratitude to a FreeBSD developer?
    You like FreeBSD and/or operating systems based on it, but have you have ever dropped that developer that maintains/implemented the feature that’s so important to you a note, saying “thank you”?
    Brandon Gooch, a system administrator at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, recently wrote the FreeBSD Foundation to express his gratitude towards FreeBSD developers in general and the recent wireless work in particular.


FreeBSD 9 developments (via):

  1. UFS journalling committed
    Jeff Roberson has committed soft-updates journalling to 9-CURRENT. It enables a small file system journal which works in combination with soft-updates to eliminate boot fsck’s. It is different from most other implementations of file system journalling in that it doesn’t journal raw blocks but sort of meta-data about meta-data
  2. GEOM disk IO scheduler framework
    A GEOM IO scheduler framework has been committed! The framework allows for multiple IO schedulers to be installed on top of GEOM providers (usually disk drives). As a consequence, potentially different schedulers can be installed on different drives. The work was done by Luigi Rizzo and Fabio Checconi.
  3. FreeBSD PowerPC 9.0 snapshot available (for testing)


FreeBSD Ports

  1. Can the current Ports directory and building of it be improved?
    “There has been some discussion lately about if and how to “revamp” the ports system to make it more usable by general users. (…) Unfortunately there has been very little feedback from users themselves – which is probably a mistake, but also – there was very little feedback from the population (not a particularily small one) that is the cross-section of users and developers. Some ideas were presented, but at the end it all started revolving around banding the gaps and smaller improvements that will, I think, be practically invisible to the end-users.”
    Ivan Voras has noted down his ideas in this post: of ports and of men.


Releases

  1. m0n0wall
    m0n0wall 1.32 is out, and it finally fixes the annoying Ethernet link state bug on ALIX boards (and others that use VIA network chips). Some more work has been done on IPv6 support, the DNS forwarder and the hardware monitor.
  2. NanoBSD
    NanoBSD on ALIX in iX 05/2010. This article  ago will appear on page 146 of ix magazine (DE) issue 05/2010


Websites / Social Media

  1. PC-BSD
    As far as i’m aware this page is not officially supported by PC-BSD  / iXsystems, but there is a Facebook PC-BSD page. There’s already quite a popular and active Facebook PC-BSD Group.
  2. iXsystems website
    As of this week iXsystems has a new website. I like the new version as it’s a lot cleaner and makes finding the right server easier. iXsystems is the corporate sponsor behind PC-BSD and FreeNAS.


Guides & Howto’s

  1. Setting up a headless torrent daemon in FreeBSD
    “I have FreeBSD running as a home server for a while now. One of the things I wanted the server to take care of is downloading torrents, so I could shut down my PC whenever I am downloading stuff. With transmission-daemon (net-p2p/transmission-daemon from ports) this is really simple.”  (tweakblogs.net)
  2. Run FreeNAS in Windows for Network Serving and Sharing
    Many of the popular servers are open source and usually are more widely supported for Linux and other Unix-like systems. However, most can be run right inside Windows. This is especially great for temporary solutions or for new or amateur administrators (serverwatch.com)


(Free)BSD Events

  1. Solution Linux 2010
    Last month   “Solutions Linux” took place in Paris, one of the major professional open source events in France. Here are some pictures of the BSD booths : http://www.bebik.net/cgi-bin/album.pl?album=2010SL
  2. A new BSDA Certification session will be held in Nantes, France on 1 June 2010 at BSDay Nantes. Check the BSD Certification calendar for events near you.
  3. BSD Professional Certification Exam Update
    A short progress report on what’s happening with the BSD


New FreeBSD Committers

Over the last few weeks a few more people have been given commit rights. It’s always good to see more people join the FreeBSD project.

  1. Ports
  • Sahil Tandon
  • Rene Ladan
  • Giuseppe Pilichi
  • Bernhard Fröhlich
  1. Source Code
  • Randi Harper
  • Ryan Stone
  • Ana Kukec


BSD / Unix Family News

  1. DragonFly BSD 2.6: towards a free clustering operating system
    This article gives in introduction into the background and history of DragonFlyBSD, its HAMMER filesystem, new features etc
    “The ultimate goal of DragonFly BSD is to allow programs to run across multiple machines as if they are running on one system. The operating system is still far from that goal, but Dillon has done a great deal of rewriting in nearly every subsystem of the kernel to lay the foundations for future work. Much of the rationale behind the design goals is explained on the project’s web site. It’s an interesting read, because it shows how they want to tackle an ambitious vision with a realistic plan…” continues (lwn.net)
  2. DragonFly BSD 2.6.1 with new swapcache released
    DragonFly BSD, the FreeBSD fork, has been updated to version 2.6.1 and incorporates a added a number of new features whilst updating the components of the clustering oriented operating system. A new swapcache has been incorporated which allows the swap space to also retain clean filesystem data and meta-data rather than just memory. (more)
  3. Why OpenBSD’s Release Process Works
    “Twelve years ago OpenBSD developers started engineering a release process that has resulted in quality software being delivered on a consistent 6 month schedule — 25 times in a row, exactly on the date promised, and with no critical bugs. This on-time delivery process is very different from how corporations manage their product releases and much more in tune with how volunteer driven communities are supposed to function. Theo de Raadt explains in this presentation how the OpenBSD release process is managed (video) and why it has been such a success”  (via)

  4. AIX 7.1 is coming
    IBM plans to deliver the next version of the AIX® operating system, AIX 7, and new releases of PowerVM™ and PowerHA SystemMirror for AIX. These new offerings are designed to help companies reduce cost, improve service and lower the risk of deploying and migrating applications to AIX on Power® Systems.The new capabilities planned for AIX 7 are designed to expand the scalability, reliability and manageability of AIX and the applications running on AIX. Key features will provide greater vertical scalability of up to 1024 threads or 256 cores in a single partition, a clustering infrastructure designed to provide highly availability applications with PowerHA SystemMirror and to simplify management of scale-out workloads. Additional AIX 7 will include new management capabilities based on IBM Systems Director that are designed to simplify the management of AIX system configuration. Finally AIX 7 will support the ability to run AIX 5.2 inside of a Workload Partition to allow consolidation of old workloads on new systems (source & more)
  5. IBM Prunes Low-Cost AIX Rev
    IBM has radically improved the bang for the buck on its Power7-based Power Systems 701 and 702 blade servers this week, and is expected to soon deliver similarly priced entry rack and tower servers. And now it has a new, lower-cost AIX 6.1 Express Edition that will match the less expensive hardware and therefore help Big Blue’s AIX platform better compete against Windows, Linux, HP-UX, and Solaris alternatives. The new AIX Express Edition takes the special low-cost pricing that was available only on JS series blade servers and now makes it available across the Power Systems line, including logical partitions on the largest Power 595 (and before too long Power 595) servers.