Google FreeBSD Summer of Code 2008 results

The FreeBSD Project is proud to have taken part in the Google Summer of Code 2008. We received more high quality applications this year than ever before. In the end it was a very tough decision to narrow it down to the 21 students selected for funding by Google. These student projects included security research, improved installation tools, new utilities, and more. Many of the students have continued working on their FreeBSD projects even after the official close of the program.

The FreeBSD project has released an update on the (finished/continuing) work of the projects:

  • Implementation of MPLS in FreeBSD
  • TCP/IP regression test suite (tcptest)
  • Porting Open Solaris Dtrace Toolkit to FreeBSD
  • Adding .db support to pkg_tools –> pkg_improved
  • Porting BSD-licensed text-processing tools from OpenBSD
  • Multibyte collation support
  • VM Algorithm Improvement
  • TCP anomaly detector
  • FreeBSD auditing system testing
  • Dynamic memory allocation for dirhash in UFS2
  • Reference implementation of the SNTP client
  • NFSv4 ACLs
  • Enhancing FreeBSD’s Libarchive
  • Allowing for parallel builds in the FreeBSD Ports
  • Ports license auditing infrastructure
  • Improving layer2 filtering
  • Porting FreeBSD to Efika (PPC bring up)
  • Audit Firewall Events from Kernel
  • Create a tiny operating system from FreeBSD

All results here.

Bordeaux 1.6 beta 1 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD

Previously we mentioned that Bordeaux was coming to FreeBSD, but now this promising product (for those needing Windows software and yet wanting the stability and security of BSD) has been released by Tom Wickline:

Over the past month we have made some major progress on the BSD port of Bordeaux. Bordeaux for FreeBSD now has a .sh installer, the same one that we use on Linux, so you will need to have py-gtk installed for the installer to work properly.

We also have a newly built .pbi for PC-BSD 7, a big thanks goes out to the folks at PC-BSD for doing the packaging for us. If you use PC-BSD you will need to install Wine 1.1.4 from their PBI directory in order for Bordeaux to work, prior versions of Wine in the directory don’t have support for wineprefixcreate.

Some of the major changes in this build are activex, flash and java are automatically installed for you when IE 6 is installed. Now IE 6 should open most pages that require activex support. We have the back end of the new cellar-manager mostly done now, to see what changes are planed just run cellar-manager –help and you will see a list of all the planed features. This version also incorporates the newest winetricks script and the updates that have been made to it over the past couple months. and of course lots of tweaks and bug fixes.

If you’re a FreeBSD or PC-BSD user and need to run any of the software that we currently support on the Linux client you might be interested in helping beta test this build and future builds up to the final stable release. At this time we cant give away beta builds, but what we can do is if you decide to purchase a license from the store for FreeBSD (beta) or PC-BSD (beta) your support will last six months after the final build is released, so don’t worry you will get a full six months of upgrades and support on the final product. And by purchasing a pre release build you can submit your input and help support the development process. Users who buy the BSD (Beta) will have the option of downloading the tgz (sh file) or the .pbi file.

That’s cool news. Would like to try this out. Definitely!

Beta releases FreeBSD-6.4 and FreeBSD-7.1

The final stage of the FreeBSD-6.4 and FreeBSD-7.1 Release cycle has begun with the first beta releases. The ISO images for Tier-1 architectures are now available for download on most of the FreeBSD mirror sites. We encourage people to test and report any outstanding bugs. Please find more information about these releases on the Release Engineering Information page.

Eric spotted the beta builds already last week. Thanks for reporting, Eric.

FreeBSD QA/release cycle graphs

Mark Linimon wrote: Ifinally got around to updating these after having let them gather dust for a while. These include bar charts showing the time periods that various releases were being worked on (QA = Quality Assurance) and were supported by the FreeBSD security team. The dates for 6.4, 7.1, and beyond are all “best-guess”.

I find the graphs much easier to understand than the text-format descriptions in various emails.

Here are some unofficial graphs of the current proposed FreeBSD release and support schedule, based on current published data.

For purposes of this chart, I am using “qa” to mean “the time between when a CVS branch is frozen and a release is made”; I am using “support” to indicate support of a release by the Security Team.

The data are up at schedule.html.

Upgrade FreeBSD Jail (howto)

The FreeBSD jail mechanism is an implementation of operating system-level virtualization that allows administrators to partition a FreeBSD-based computer system into several independent mini-systems called jails. FreeBSD jails offer security, ease of delegation and os level virtualization. To upgrade your jail using make world use the following commands.

Oh, just in case you didn’t know, you can get FBSD Jail T-shirts from FreeBSD Mall ;-)

FreeBSD Jails - there's no escape

gmirror – recovering data from a failed hard disk

Having a working RAID and data mirroring set up on your server/PC is great for when your one of your hard disks dies, but what to do when this really happens to you? How do you get that data back?

This article shows what to do to retrieve your data back on a FreeBSD system that uses gmirror

I like RAID. On my development server, I use both hardware and software RAID. For hardware RAID on FreeBSD, I like 3Ware. For software RAID, I tend to use gmirror, because I don’t need more than RAID-1.

Some time ago I added two 120GB HDD to this system. One was SATA, one was PATA. They were joined together via gmirror. Tonight I received some errors that one of the drives was failing. I replaced the drive, and recovered the mirror. I’ll show you what I did, mostly so I know what to do the next time it happens, but also so you can see what to do as well.