Review of “The Book of PF”

Dru Lavigne has reviewedThe Book of PF – A No-Nonsense Guide to the OpenBSD Firewall“. Peter N.M. Hansteen, the writer, has written this book as an expanded follow-up to his very popular online PF tutorial. PF (Packet Filter) is a robust packet filter that originated in OpenBSD and that has been ported to FreeBSD.

Dru concludes here short review with:

All in all, this book is very readable and a must-have resource for anyone who deals with firewall configurations. If you’ve heard good things about PF and have been thinking of giving it a go, this book is definitely for you. Start at the beginning and before you know it you’ll be through the book and quite the PF guru. Even if you’re already a PF guru, this is still a good book to keep on the shelf to refer to in thorny situations or to lend to colleagues.

Check the book details and other reviews here on Amazon. Recommended Buy.

New FreeBSD source and ports committers

The FreeBSD project has welcomed 2 new source committers:

  • Rafal Jaworowski (26/12/2007)
  • Weongyo Jeong (28/12/2007)

and one ports committer

  • Wesley Shields

To find out how the FreeBSD Project operates have a look at this video (How the FreeBSD Project works), read this paragraph (FreeBSD Governance Structure) on Wikipedia, or listen to BSDTalk podcast no 114.

Juniper Networks releases FreeBSD/MIPS port to public

Juniper Networks, Inc. has donated a reference FreeBSD port to the MIPS architecture to the FreeBSD Project. (Juniper’s embedded router operating system (JUNOS) is based on FreeBSD.)

The donated code will be used as one reference for creating an official project-supported FreeBSD/MIPS offering. There are no references to JNPR-specific hardware pieces but a lot of mature code for generic MIPS devices that mips2 tree lacks: VM/pmap, libc, FPU support.

Information about the code drop can be found here.

MySQL 6.0 installed on FreeBSD

The other day I came across some neat instructions on how to set up FreeBSD with MySQL 6.0. It’s pretty straight forward:

  • Download MySQL 6.0 here

  • Extract the files to /usr/local/mysql

  • Add MySQL group "groupadd mysql"

  • Add MySQL user "useradd -g mysql mysql"

  • Change the permissions with "chown mysql -R /usr/local/mysql" from /usr/local/mysql run "scripts/mysql_install_db --user=mysql"

  • Change the permissions again "chown -R root ." and "chown -R mysql data"

  • Now run the server "bin/mysqld_safe --user=mysql &"

Source: FreeBSD World

FreeBSD at Cisco

Cisco Systems has announced plans for a UNIX-based operating system for their network equipment.

The next generation of Cisco’s products will be powered by Open Source operating systems and will be built from Open Source components. Our team will build the core technology used in a wide variety of Cisco products.

This quote is from a job ad by Cisco. There are a number of jobs that seem to be primarily FreeBSD-oriented, including jobs relating to ports/package maintenance, kernel development and server management.

Wow, Cisco is looking for new employees with in-depth knowledge of FreeBSD.

Interested? Search here for “FreeBSD”.

BSDCan 2008; dates and call for papers

BSDCan 2008, held in May, in Ottowa, has the initial call for papers out. They have space for informal talks and presentations too.

BSDCan is an enormously successful grass-roots style conference. It brings together a great mix of *BSD developers and users for a nice blend of both developer-centric and user-centric presentations, food, and activities.

BSDCan 2008 will be held 16-17 May 2008, in Ottawa.

The organisers are now requesting proposals for papers. The papers should be written with a very strong technical content bias.

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Q4/2007)

There’s a new issue of the FreeBSD Foundation newsletter (Q4)/

The innovation of the past lives on in FreeBSD. From SMP and network scalability to innovations in security APIs and wireless networking, the technology of FreeBSD is making an impact on our world. What future piece of BSD technology will help foster a new public commodity like the Internet? I can’t say, but the past shows us that investing in open source OS development and its commercial use pays large dividends. The two testimonials in this newsletter from Isilon and Network Appliance show this process at work.

In this issue:

  • Letter From the Vice President
  • End-of-Year Fundraising Drive
  • Foundation Mailing List
  • First Copy of Absolute FreeBSD Auction
  • FreeBSD Testimonial from Isilon Systems
  • FreeBSD Testimonial from NetApp
  • Improving the Hardware Performance Counter Support Project
  • EuroBSDCon 2007
  • 2007 Grant and Travel Grant Recipients
  • Financials

GPL vs BSD, a matter of sustainability

Both licensing models have been around for a very long time. I don’t know which predates which, but it really doesn’t matter. The spirit behind both licenses is very similar: free software is good. But they realize this idea in different ways.

In the GPL license you have the four freedoms: to run the software, to have the source code, to distribute the software, to distribute your modifications to the software.

The BSD license is different, because it gives *you* the right to distribute the software, but it does not oblige you to make sure that the next guy has any such right.

Read this interesting article here