BSD in the routing industry (video)


Massimiliano Stucchi: BSD in the routing industry

AsiaBSDCon 2010 paper session.

Abstract:

The BSD family has always been very well known for its robust network stack, hence it has been widely used in many different fields and applications. In the ISP market, though, the situation is totally different, and solutions employing *BSD operating systems are often discarded in favour of proprietary solutions.

In this talk we will discuss the different possibilities offered by the BSD operating systems family in terms of networking tools and practices, compared to proprietary solutions offered by companies such as Cisco and Juniper, detailing the differences between them and highlighting the major points and drawbacks of each of them, up to a cost comparison in real field applications.

Real field applications will be introduced via explanation of the solutions created using BSD-based routing software in the real industry running in two different environments, an ISP spanning Europe and another one offering WISP services.

We will also delve into the experience in running a FreeBSD-/OpenBSD- and OpenBGPd-based route server at MINAP, the MIlanNeutralAccessPoint, describing success stories and guiding the audience into a comparison with the other route servers running at the same IX, powered by Linux and Bird/Quagga.

Quiet Computing with BSD (video)


Constantine A. Murenin: Quiet Computing with BSD

AsiaBSDCon 2010 paper session.

Abstract:

Quiet Computing with BSD (Programming system hardware monitors for quiet computing)

In this talk, we will present an overview of the features and common problems of microprocessor system hardware monitors as they relate to the topic of silent computing. In a nutshell, the topic of programmable fan control will be explored. A live demonstration of the fan-controlling prototype might be possible.

Silent computing is an important subject as its practice reduces the amount of unnecessary stress and improves the motivation of the workforce, at home and in the office.

Attendees will gain knowledge on how to effectively programme the chips to minimise fan noise without impeding reliability or causing any system failures, as well as some basic principles regarding the practice of quiet computing.

A patch for programming the most popular chips (like those from Winbond) is already publicly available for the OpenBSD operating system, although the talk itself will be more specific to the microprocessor system hardware monitors themselves, as opposed to any specific interfacing with thereof in modern operating systems like OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFly BSD and FreeBSD.

Wireless Mesh Networks under FreeBSD (video)


Rui Paulo: Wireless Mesh Networks under FreeBSD

AsiaBSDCon 2010 paper session.

Abstract:

With the advent of low cost wireless chipsets, wireless mesh networks became much more attractive for both companies, governments, and the general consumer. Wireless mesh networks are being used extensively since the popularization of the 802.11 wireless technologies, but usually they worked with the help of layer 3 routing technologies.

Since 802.11 didn’t provide any kind of support for wireless mesh networks, in 2004, IEEE created the Task Group s (TGs) to develop a new amendment to 802.11 which would define the operation of a wireless mesh network using existing 802.11 hardware and having a routing protocol work at layer 2. Later, the amendment also included provisions for mesh authentication, encryption, link management, bridging mesh networks with other types of networks, and channel reservation.

This paper will talk about the FreeBSD implementation of 802.11s that’s available in version 8.0 and beyond. This work was sponsored by The FreeBSD Foundation.

Porting HPC Tools to FreeBSD (video)


AsiaBSDCon 2010 paper session.

Abstract:

Since 2001 we have used FreeBSD as a high performance computing (HPC) cluster operating system. In the process we have ported a number of HPC tools including Ganglia, Globus, Open MPI, and Sun Grid Engine. In this talk we will discuss the process of porting these types of applications and issues encountered while maintaining these tools. In addition to generally issues of porting code from one Unix-like operating system to another, there are several type of porting common to many HPC infrastructure codes which we will explore. Beyond porting, we will discuss how the ports collection aids our use of HPC applications and ways we think overall integration could be improved.

PC-SYSINSTALL – A new system installer backend for PC-BSD and FreeBSD

This presentation was done by Kris Moore, founder of the PC-BSD Project at AsiaBSDCon 2010.

Abstract: The sysinstall tool has been the default system installer for FreeBSD for more than a decade now. While is it has proven itself to be reliable and resilient over the years, it doesn’t support many of the new features that FreeBSD offers, as well as being un-intuitive for desktop users, who expect an easy to use graphical front-end to perform their installation. To solve these two problems the “pc-sysinstall” backend was created and now is in usage for PC-BSD 8.0. This new installer backend provides much of the same functionality as sysinstall, while offering many new features such as support for ZFS, Encryption, mirroring, scriptable installs and the ability to work with different front-ends, such as a QT based GUI. The backend also supports installing regular FreeBSD, which allows server administrators to quickly perform an installation using the new disk features it offers.


Bordeaux 2.0.4 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD Released

The Bordeaux Technology Group released Bordeaux 2.0.4 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD yesterday.

Bordeaux 2.0.4 is a maintenance release that fixes a number of small bugs. With this release the Bordeux UI changed from a GTKDialog to a GTKWindow, the “OK” button has also been re-named to “Install”.

The Wine bundle has been upgraded from 1.1.36 to 1.1.41, the latest winetricks release is included, and support for the new Steam UI has been added.

The Bordeaux UI changes come from our working agreement with StormOS.

With version 2.0.0 and onward Bordeau’s own Wine build are bundled and many tools and libraries that Wine depends upon. With this release comes Wine 1.1.41, Cabextract, Mozilla Gecko, Unzip, Wget and other support libraries and tools.

The cost of Bordeaux 2.0.4 is $20.00. Anyone who has purchased Bordeaux in the past six months is entitled to a free upgrade. Bordeaux comes with six months of upgrades and support and of course a 30-day money back guarantee.

Supported Applications/Games:

  • Microsoft Office 2007
  • Microsoft Office 2003
  • Microsoft Office 2000
  • Microsoft Office 97
  • Microsoft Office Visio 2003
  • Microsoft Office Project 2003
  • Adobe Photoshop 6
  • Adobe Image Ready 3
  • Adobe Photoshop 7
  • Adobe Image Ready 7
  • Adobe Photoshop CS
  • Adobe Photoshop CS2
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6
  • Steam and Steam based Games
  • Apple QuickTime 6.5.2 Player
  • IrfaView 4.25 (Image files only)
  • Winetricks support

The Bordeaux Technology Group is a software services and development company specializing in Windows compatibility software. Users of Linux, FreeBSD, PC-BSD, Solaris, OpenSolaris and Mac OSX systems from time to time find themselves in the need to run specialized Windows software. The Bordeaux suite enables access to these programs and data in a seamless and low cost manner without requiring licensing of Microsoft Technology. The Bordeaux Group also provides migration services and support for alternative operating systems specializing in Windows compatibility.

More info

DVB-S Live TV on FreeBSD with MythTV 0.23 and webcamd

It’s not true anymore that FreeBSD does not support any DVB-S devices. Thanks to the work of Hans Petter Selasky on video4bsd there are now DVB-S/2 devices for USB that just work.

img/articles/mythtv-0.23-DVB-1_small.jpg

The work on MythTV to get this running only took me one evening and was just because nobody compiled mythtv with v4l support lately. It also helped a lot that Jürgen Lock already played with the same device and found and fixes a few things.

So what do you need to do now if you want to build your PVR on FreeBSD? (continues)

iXsystems donates new server for FreeBSD QAT Project

iXsystems has hosted the Quality Assurance Tinderbox used within the FreeBSD ports infrastructure for several months. The Quality Assurance Tinderbox (QAT) is an automated QA system used to identify problems in FreeBSD ports and packages, by building ports and generating the corresponding binary packages, then generating automated failure notifications. Recently, iXsystems decided to help the FreeBSD community improve upon QAT’s existing capabilities by updating the existing QAT server hardware.

The previous QAT server ran only FreeBSD 8.0-STABLE AMD64, which limited its ability to detect issues that port builds may have with other FreeBSD versions and architectures. In order to increase the functionality of QAT, iXsystems upgraded the hardware to increase speed and to extend its quality checks to other versions of the FreeBSD operating system. The new QAT server is housed in a 1U form factor with dual quad-core Intel® Xeon® 5400 Series processors. This machine features 8 total processing cores, 16GB of memory, and two 1TB SATA hard drives. QAT is being heavily refactored to utilize these new hardware resources as efficiently as possible.

[Read more…]

Google SoC 2010: FreeBSD Projects

Google has just announced the projects it will be funding this summer during its annual Summer of Code Event :

6 FreeBSD related Projects are included :

  • Jacub Klama : Generic DMA engine framework for FreeBSD

The aim of this project is to provide a generic, flexible framework for initiating and controlling DMA transfers using General Purpose DMA engines, found in most of embedded SoCs – along with tests and documentation. There are analogous frameworks for NetBSD (dmover(4)) and Solaris (ddi_dmae(9F)), but they are not well suited for embedded targets and don’t offer all required features.

  • Alexandre Fiveg: Ringmap Capturing Stack for High Performance Packet Capturing in FreeBSD

The ringmap project has drawn a lot of interest from several research groups. I would like to continue my work on this project in order to improve and extend the developed software for production use in the open source community. I also would like to establish contacts to other software developers and use the opportunity to take part in GSoC for further development of ringmap.

  • Volodymyr Serbinenko: Port FreeBSD to Yeeloong

Yeloong, also known as “rms laptop” is a Chinese-designed netbook based on Loongson 2F CPU. It’s popular among Free Software enthusiasts and people who want a small yet powerful netbook and don’t care about windows being available. FreeBSD could profit much from thismips relaunch. When this port is done porting to other Loongson-based device should be relatively easy.

  • Mohammed Farrag : Reduced FreeBSD kernel size for embedded devices
  • Zheng Liu: Enhance FreeBSD ext2fs to support preallocation and update ext2fs to able to read ext4 file systems

This project implement preallocation in ext2fs and update ext2fs to be able to read ext4 file systems and possibly add other functionality, such as write ext4 file systems.

  • Benjamin Fiedler: BSD-licensed Text-Processing Tools

I will write or complete BSD-licensed replacements for the tools man, diff, sdiff, and sort. The rewrite of man will be necessarily be accompanied by integrating the FreeBSD mdocml port into the system base and configuring it as a replacement for the entire groff suite of tools.

Wishing all students the best. More details to follow.

FreeBSD 8.1 Release Date: 9 July 2010

Ken Smith wrote to the freebsd-stable mailing list that FreeBSD 8.1 is scheduled to be released on 9 July 2010:

For those of you who are wondering when 8.1-RELEASE might arrive, we have discussed it and come up with the initial target schedule.
The highlights are:

Freeze		May 24th, 2010
BETA1		May 28th, 2010
RC1		June 11th, 2010
RC2		June 25th, 2010
RELEASE		July 9th, 2010

As usual, that's subject to change but it's at least our current target.

As most of you will know, PC-BSD’s release cycle is closely linked to FreeBSD’s, so we will see PC-BSD 8.1 arrive (shortly) after that date.

According to the PC-BSD 8.1 todo list, most items are  implemented, and we are always looking for testers;

The next 8-Stable PC-BSD snapshot is now available at the usual place:

ftp://ftp.pcbsd.org/pub/snapshots/8/

This version fixes numerous issues with partitioning, switches us to using gpart for pretty much everything, and also adds the ability to delete slices / create new slices on MBR setups. It also has some enhancements to the PC-BSD boot-loader splash screen, which allows us to set a variety of boot options.

We need volunteers to test the further improved PC-BSD Installer.

The PC-BSD 8.0 installer is so good that some use it now to install FreeBSD:

So today, I need to install FreeBSD clean in a VM for testing. I thought, I am going to use the PCBSD 8 install disk because it is faster.
I am sorry, but I am a Sysinstall hater.
Thanks PC-BSD for the much faster installer. (source)