Lumina Desktop 0.8.3 Released!

The developers of PC-BSD have released Lumina Desktop version 0.8.3.

Original link: https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/lumina-desktop-0-8-3-released.51085/

The next version of the Lumina Desktop Environment has just been released!

This is mainly a bugfix release to correct an urgent issue with the system tray on FreeBSD 11, but there are a number of other slight improvements/updates included as well. The full list of changes is included at the bottom of this announcement, but the notable changes are as follows:

  • New Panel Plugin: “Application Launcher“
    • This allows the user to pin the shortcut for an application directly to a panel.
  • New Utility: “lumina-xconfig“
    • This utility allows the user to easily enable/disable additional monitors/screens within the desktop session.
  • Fix the issue with transparent system tray icons on FreeBSD 11
  • Add support for the XDG autostart specifications.

The FreeBSD port has already been updated and this version will be included in the next set of PC-BSD package updates (“Edge” packages being created now) as well as included in the next PC-BSD 11 image for April (coming soon).

Reminder: The Lumina desktop environment is still considered to be “beta-quality”, so if you find things that either don’t work or don’t work well, please report them on the PC-BSD bug tracker so that they can get fixed as soon as possible. Feel free to also post tickets for any feature requests or improvements that you think might be useful!

 

Lumina-0.8.3 Continue reading

Setting up FreeBSD and jails on Azure – part 1: networking

This tutorial by user Gianugo shows us how to set up FreeBSD jails on the Microsoft Azure platform.

Original post: http://www.boldlyopen.com/2015/03/17/setting-up-freebsd-and-jails-on-azure-part-1-networking/

azureI set up this blog on Azure as an excuse to play with the new FreeBSD VM Depot image, learn more about jails and write the occasional blog post about random stuff. I took extensive notes while at it and I will be posting them here for future reference and to help the occasional search engine user.

I will skip all the clicking through that can easily get to a running FreeBSD VM in Azure. There is tons of FreeBSD documentation, including specific Azure tutorials that my team and others have written. I am lazy, so I will just point out specific Azure differences and how to take care of them.

A word of caution: please don’t consider what you read here to be authoritative. I’m doing this for fun and my free time is what it is, so don’t think I researched this stuff thoroughly. It worked for me and seems to be still working as I write this – that’s all I needed.

Let’s start with networking. Every public cloud has their own approach, and Azure is no different. Two things to remember about Azure IP management:

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FreeBSD and the YARNBUG – more trouble at the Random Number Mill

A bug involving the Random Number Generator has been found in FreeBSD. Check out the article for more details.

The latest vulnerability-with-a-snazzy-name is YARNBUG, and it affects the most recent version of FreeBSD.

Actually, it’s not really called YARNBUG – we just made that up to stand for “Yet Another Random Number Bug.”

We’ve written about problems with randomness many times on Naked Security, because randomness is actually much more important that many people realise.

Loosely put, computer security as good as depends on randomness, and that means something of a paradox: access to a reliable supply of completely unpredictable numbers.

For example, imagine that you encrypt the same document multiple times with the same secret key: you need to “seed” the encryption each time with a random number, or else you’ll keep getting the same encrypted output.

Even though that wouldn’t tell an attacker what’s inside the document, it would needlessly signal that the encrypted files were identical, which isn’t supposed to happen.

Of course, whenever you need a random number, it really must be random.

If it can be guessed or predicted, even a bit, then, well, it simply isn’t random, and you’ll end up with patterns that can be anticipated in data that’s supposed to be entirely empty of meaning until it’s decrypted.

Full announcement: https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2015/02/19/freebsd-and-the-yarnbug-more-trouble-at-the-random-number-mill/

KDE Frameworks 5.6.0 Released: More Libraries Now Work On FreeBSD

klogo-official-crystal-3000x3000Ahead of KDE Plasma 5.2 due out later this month is the release of KDE Frameworks 5.6.0.

Version 5.6.0 of KDE Frameworks, the KDE libraries added on top of Qt5, is another monthly update. KDE Frameworks 5.6.0 has some fixes for building on FreeBSD of the various libraries, KIO has support for .hidden files, fixed builds for various libraries when using MSVC (Microsoft Visual C), Solid supports fstab and UPower back-ends now on FreeBSD, and various other changes.

The full list of KDE Frameworks 5.6.0 changes can be found via the KDE.org announcement.

Original post: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTg4NDc

FreeBSD Finishes Switching Over To GNOME 3.x

Gnomelogo.svgFreeBSD GNOME developers have had various GNOME 3.x components in the FreeBSD Ports repository for months, and with GNOME 2.x now being decommissioned by this BSD operating system, the GNOME3 X11 desktop has replaced GNOME2 on the DVD install media script.

With this change made on Thursday, “Switch to x11/gnome3 now that x11/gnome2 no longer exists in the ports tree.” This change is to the pkg-stage.sh script of FreeBSD for including the x11/gnome3 packages on the FreeBSD DVD when generating new ISOs. KDE 4.x remains present as part of the DVD packages. Since November, the GNOME 2 desktop has been removed from FreeBSD Ports.

The GNOME3 support in FreeBSD is currently at GNOME 3.14.2 via the x11/gnome3 ports package. More information on the state of GNOME for FreeBSD can be found via the project’s Wiki. While not part of the install media, MATE is available on FreeBSD 10.x for those wishing to continue having a GNOME2-like desktop.

Original post: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=FreeBSD-GNOME3-DVD

Configuring X forwarding between BSD and Windows

This tutorial by grundlig shows us how to configure X forwarding between BSD and Windows.

On Unix systems, windowing systems are an optional component. There are numerous window systems but the most prevalent, as I understand it, is X. It’s a networked client/server model, where the machine with the display and input devices is called the server, and the machine running windowed apps against this server is the client. This is backwards from how you typically think about clients and servers, i.e. servers are usually headless and clients are usually responsible for rendering data from servers and translating input.

I usually interact with my BSD machine from my Windows laptop using PuTTY. But running Emacs in a terminal window is sometimes hard on the eyes, it’s hard to get good fonts, color schemes, etc. I wanted to see if I could launch Emacs from PuTTY but have it render its UI over the X protocol on my Windows laptop. This was harder than I thought, and I didn’t find any step-by-step tutorial to help me troubleshoot, so here’s an account of what worked for me. Note that I started from a relatively clean install of FreeBSD 10.1, with only sshd and some basic packages installed.

Check out the tutorial with full instructions here: https://grundlig.wordpress.com/2015/01/10/configuring-x-forwarding-between-bsd-and-windows/

The FreeBSD Foundation introduces new board member

Recently, The FreeBSD Foundation announced the addition of Cheryl R. Blain to the Board of Directors. We sat down with Cheryl to find out more about her background and what brought her to the Foundation. Take a look at what she has to say:

Tell us a little about yourself, and how you got involved with FreeBSD?
I was bit by the entrepreneur bug in 1999 when working for a non-profit. I’ve worked with high-tech, venture-backed, small-cap companies ever since.  My typical engagement finds me streamlining operations and sales teams to prepare companies for their next step forward, which most often involves financing.

Check out the full blog and interview here: http://freebsdfoundation.blogspot.com/2014/12/more-from-your-newest-board-member.html

Google offering 5 travel grants for female computer scientists (EuroBSDCon 2014)

GFE_Google is offering 5 travel grants for female computer scientists to attend EuroBSDCon 2014. The deadline to apply is Sunday, August 31st.

As part of Google’s ongoing commitment to encourage women to excel in
computing and technology, Google is pleased to offer Women in Tech
Travel and Conference Grants to attend the EuroBSDcon 2014
conference[1].

5 grants are offered, which include:
* Free registration for the conference
* Up to 1000 EUR towards travel costs (to be paid after the conference)

To be eligible for a grant, the candidate must:
* Be a woman working in or studying Computer Science, Computer
Engineering, or a technical field related to the conference subject
* Have a strong academic background
* Demonstrate leadership in the workplace or in school
* Attend the core day(s) of the main conference

Head on over the following link to find out how to apply: https://www.google.ch/edu/students/google-travel-and-conference-grants/#!europe