Linux, Solaris, and FreeBSD driver 352.30

NVIDIA Linux Graphics developer aplattner has released the latest update to their NVIDIA driver. For those using the Tesla K80 or GeForce 910M GPUs, support has been added for FreeBSD. Follow the link below to download for your distribution.



Release highlights since 352.21:

  • Added support for the following GPU:
    • Tesla K80
    • GeForce 910M
  • Fixed a bug that caused poor video post-processing performance in VDPAU when operating on a large number of video streams simultaneously.
  • Updated nvidia-installer to use modprobe(8) when leaving the NVIDIA kernel module loaded after installation, instead of insmod(8) or libkmod. This allows the kernel module to honor any configuration directives that apply to it in /etc/modprobe.d when it is loaded.
  • Fixed a bug that allowed console messages from the Linux kernel to be drawn over the user interface of nvidia-installer.

[README | Linux x86 | Linux x86_64 | Linux ARM | Solaris | FreeBSD x86 | FreeBSD x86_64]

Aaron Plattner
NVIDIA Linux Graphics

FreeBSD now has NUMA? Why’d it take so long?

Adrian Chadd, known for his extensive WiFI work, writes about his findings of NUMA (non-uniform memory access) in FreeBSD.


I just committed “NUMA” to FreeBSD. Well, no, I didn’t. I did almost no actual NUMA-y work in FreeBSD. I just exposed the existing NUMA stuff in FreeBSD out and re-enabled it.

FreeBSD-9 introduced basic NUMA awareness in the physical allocator (sys/vm/vm_phys.c.) It implemented first-touch page allocation, and then fell back to searching through the domains, round-robin style. It wasn’t perfect, for some workloads it was apparently okay. But it had some shortcomings – it wasn’t configurable, UMA and other subsystems didn’t know about NUMA domains, and the scheduler really didn’t know about NUMA domains. So I’m sure there are plenty of workloads which it didn’t work for.

That was all ripped out before FreeBSD-10. FreeBSD-10 NUMA just implements round-robin physical page allocation. It still tracks the per-domain physical memory regions, but it doesn’t do any kind of NUMA aware allocation. From what I can gather, it was removed until something ‘better’ would land.

However, nothing (yet) has landed. So I decided I’d take a look into it. I found that for a lot of simple workloads (ie, where you’re doing lots of anonymous memory allocation – eg, you’re doing math crunching) the FreeBSD-9 model works fine. It’s also a perfectly good starting point for experimenting.

So all my NUMA work in -HEAD does is provide an API to exactly the above. It doesn’t teach the kernel APIs about domain aware allocations – there’s currently no way to ask for memory from a specific domain when calling UMA, or contigmalloc, etc. The scheduler doesn’t know about NUMA, so threads/processes will migrate off-socket very quickly unless you explicitly limit things. Devices don’t yet do NUMA local work – the ACPI code is in there to enumerate which NUMA domain they’re in, but it’s not used anywhere just yet.

Then what is it good for?

[Read more…]

Ethereum on Different Operating Systems (self.ethereum)

FreeBSD user /u/aedigix shows us how to get Ethereum set up on FreeBSD. Ethereum is a virtualized platform for decentralized applications.



For go-ethereum If you install go 1.4 you can just do the following:

git clone
cd go-ethereum && git checkout tags/<latest stable> && make geth 

For cpp-ethereum/solidity compiler This is a little bit more involved but I am able to build on FreeBSD 10 and 11 using the following steps:

Dependencies which should be available in Fedora’s yum repo, FreeBSD/Gentoo ports, etc….

llvm35 gcc48 cmake boost-all-1.55.0 ncurses automake libtool unzip gmp leveldb yasm miniupnpc readline curl cryptopp libmicrohttpd libjson++ argtable opencl ode npm doxygen gmake cmake

On FreeBSD I have to build jsoncpp and libjson-rpc-cpp manually with the following steps:


git clone
cd jsoncpp && git checkout tags/1.6.2
mkdir build && cd build
cmake -DCMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="-fPIC" ..
gmake install


cd libjson-rpc-cpp
git checkout tags/v0.5.0
mkdir build && cd build
cmake -DCMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="-fPIC" ..
gmake install

Then build cpp-ethereum:

git clone
cd cpp-ethereum && git checkout develop
mkdir build && cd build
cmake -DFATDB=1 -DUSENPM=1 -DETHASHCL=1 -DEVMJIT=1 -DLLVM_DIR=/usr/local/lib/llvm-3.5/share/llvm/cmake ..
gmake -j8

OPNsense 15.7.4 Released

The developers of OPNsense have released version 15.7.4. Changes noted are updated sudo, FreeBSD, languages, menu, firmware, and dashboard fixes, etc. Follow the link below to download the latest version.




Hello friends,

another week it is, this time with a rather exciting TCP state fix in the FreeBSD kernel. We’ve also taken the time to work through most of the code base to eradicate code warnings and now enable them by default in the crash reporter. We’re half-expecting another stable update early next week just to make sure your infrastructure keeps running as smoothly as possible.

Here are the the full patch notes:

  • updated sudo 1.8.14p3 [1], pcre 8.37_2 [2], and FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE-p15 [3]
  • firmware: fix upgrade when using opnsense-devel package
  • proxy: fix config write for multiple interfaces
  • crash reporter: raise PHP log level to warnings after an extensive cleanup
  • dashboard: made widgets translatable (contributed by Fabian Franz)
  • firewall logs: usability improvements (contributed by Fabian Franz)
  • languages: Simplified Chinsese 64% complete
  • languages: German 40% complete
  • menu: fixed navigation for PPPoE edit

Stay safe,
Your OPNsense team


FreeBSD 10.2-BETA2 Now Available

The developers of FreeBSD have made available version 10.2-BETA2. See below for the documented changes.

Download link:



The second BETA build of the 10.2-RELEASE release cycle is now

Installation images are available for:

o amd64 GENERIC
o i386 GENERIC
o ia64 GENERIC
o powerpc GENERIC
o powerpc64 GENERIC64
o sparc64 GENERIC

The image checksums follow at the end of this email.

FreeBSD/arm SD card images are available for:


Note:  For convenience for those without console access to supported arm
devices, a default 'freebsd' user exists for ssh(1) login.  The password
is 'freebsd', which it is strongly recommended to change after gaining
access to the system.  Additionally, the 'root' user password is 'root',
which is also recommended to change.

[Read more…]

How To Find Out FreeBSD Version and Patch Level Number

This short tutorial by user Vivek Gite (nixCraft) shows us how to figure out your FreeBSD version and patch level number.


How do I find out my FreeBSD server version and patch level of the installed system using command line option?

Tutorial details
Difficulty Easy (rss)
Root privileges No
Requirements None
Estimated completion time 1m

You can use any one of the following command to display the FreeBSD operating system version and patch level:a) freebsd-version command – Show the version and patch level of the installed system

b) uname command – Show information about the system

Say hello to freebsd-version command

The freebsd-version command appeared in FreeBSD version 10.0. To see the version and patch level of the installed kernel:
freebsd-verion -k
To see the version and patch level of the installed userland:
freebsd-verion -u
Sample outputs:

Fig.01: freebsd-version and other commands in action
(Fig.01: freebsd-version and other commands in action)

You can see a system being repaired using a live CD:
mount -rt ufs /dev/ada0p2 /mnt
env ROOT=/mnt /mnt/bin/freebsd-version -ku

You can also use the following command to find out if FreeBSD kernel is running in 32bit or 64bit mode:
# getconf LONG_BIT

Sample outputs:

Old good uname command

Type the following command (it works on all versions of FreeBSD):
umame -a
uname -mrs

FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE-p10 amd64

GhostBSD 10.1 BETA2 now available

The developers of GhostBSD have made available version 10.1 BETA2. Some changes noted are hybrid ISO image for DVD/USB, XFCE re-added, UI improvement of installer partition editor, options to choose boot manager, and more.


We are pleased to announce the availability GhostBSD 10.1 BETA2 MATE & XFCE  which is available on SourceForge for the amd64 and i386 architectures.

Before going further I will like to say a special thanks Ovidiu who recently join back the project and Andrea who join the project, they have help to make GhostBSD better, add up new feature and fixed issue.

Changes and fix between 10.1-BETA1 and 10.1-BETA2 include:

  • GhostBSD ISO image is hybrid that can be install on DVD or USB stick
  • XFCE as been added back to the project
  • The installer partition editor have been improved at the UI and at the system level
  • The user can chose to install the BSD boot manager, Grub boot manager or simply None and use their Linux Grub
  • The installation process failed to copy has been improved and fix
  • Software from pkg or ports can be now installed from live DVD/USB session
  • PCDM Locales and Keyboard Layout are now functional
  • Some Radon/ATI and Intel issue has been fix
  • Qt development tool has been removed from the default system
  • SpiderOak has been removed from the default system

Where to download:

The image checksums, hybrid ISO(DVD, USD) images are available here:

[Read more…]

Using bhyve on FreeBSD

This tutorial by will show you how to setup and use bhyve on FreeBSD. bhyve is a BSD hypervisor and virtual machine manager which relies on features such as Extended Page Tables and VirtIO network/storage drivers.


freebsd_bhyveI wanted to write an article about bhyve for a long time now, and fortunately I recently had the time to do just that. Bhyve has the potential to became a very sophisticated, and advanced hypervisor.

1. Introduction

I’m not sure since when, but bhyve now supports libvirt. That’s great news, given that libvirt is a universal tool which helps in managing VMs. There are quite a few hypervisors compatible with libvirt, for example KVM, Xen, Linux containers (LXC) and a bunch of others. On the other hand, there are only a few graphical fronteds compatible with it, for example Virtual Machine Manager (virt-manager), which is a general purpose VM management tool. This can be installed to a computer and the hypervisors can be managed from there. Virt-manager is generally good for a few hypervisors, with 10-20 VMs, but managing a cloud infrastructure is quite a challenge with it. There a few tools compatible with libvirt, which are targeted at clouds or greater deployment.

In this article, I will cover the Virtual Machine Manager (virt-manager). This tool allows for the basic management of VMs, such as installing, starting, deleting etc. The goal of this document is to introduce the installation and configuration of bhyve to a FreeBSD host, libvirt, and the virt-manager to a remote computer, then to explain how you can connect from the virt-manager to the remote host. This setup allows the management of VMs remotely. This article is customized for CentOS guest installation as a guest, however other Linux guests could be installed and used in a similar way.

As its current state, libvirt is not fully compatible with bhyve and therefore interacting with VMs with libvirt is not possbile. However, this article provides instructions for installing and managing VMs with bhyve itself.

2. Additional informations for this article

[Read more…]