BSD releases: FreeBSD 7.3-RC1, PC-BSD 8.0-RC2 and FreeNAS 0.7.1

Over the last week we have seen new versions of FreeBSD, PC-BSD and FreeNAS:

FreeBSD 7.3-RC1 (link)

Ken Smith has announced the release candidate of FreeBSD 7.3, a new version of the project’s legacy branch:

“The second of the test builds for the 7.3-RELEASE cycle, 7.3-RC1, is now available for amd64, i386, pc98, and sparc64 architectures. The schedule has slipped by about a week but so far it looks like we are on track for just having one more public test build (7.3-RC2) followed by the release itself. If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Gnats PR system or on the freebsd-stable mailing list. There have been some significant changes to the ports that are not incorporated in this set of pre-built packages (e.g. the default version of Perl has been updated to 5.10). If you are using csup/cvsup methods to update an older system the branch tag to use is now RELENG_7_3. The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of i386 and amd64 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.”


PC-BSD 8.0-RC2 (link)

The PC-BSD Team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 8.0-RC2 (Hubble Edition), running FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE-P2, and KDE 4.3.5

PC-BSD 8.0 contains a number of enhancements and improvements over the 7.x series. For a full list of changes, please refer to the changelog. Some of the notable changes are:

  • FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE-P2
  • KDE 4.3.5
  • Brand new System Installer, allows the install of PC-BSD or FreeBSD
  • Run in Live mode directly from DVD
  • Updated Software Manager, allows browsing and installing applications directly
  • Support for 3D acceleration with NVIDIA drivers on amd64

FreeNAS 0.7.1 (link)

Changelogdownload

FreeBSD 8.0 installation walk-through

Vincent Danen who works on the Red Hat Security Response Team has written a quick walk-through of the FreeBSD 8.0 installation procedure:

FreeBSD, and the other BSDs, are exceptionally stable and powerful operating systems, but they can be quite different from Linux. Although they share common principles and ideals, and a huge amount of software, when it comes down to it, FreeBSD and Linux are two different beasts. This doesn’t make FreeBSD better or worse, but it is something to be aware of. Perhaps the most challenging thing about FreeBSD is the initial installation. While PC-BSD, another BSD variant, has made a lot of headway in making BSD easy to use, FreeBSD is still king as far as the BSD’s go.

With the recent 8.0 release, it may be time to give FreeBSD a look. FreeBSD is favoured by many for service management and hosting, running Web servers and mail servers, etc. But it works as a fully functional desktop as well. This tip will take a quick walk through the installation. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on whether or not you are familiar with installing FreeBSD, the installer has not changed significantly over the years. Yes, it is still text-based.”

… continues

FreeBSD 8.0 installation walk-through (techrepublic)

Released: Bordeaux 2.0 for FreeBSD / PC-BSD

If you love using Linux or BSD operating systems you may find yourself sometimes in situations that you need to use Windows software. If that is you, then you may be interested in Bordeaux, a program that lets you run Microsoft Office, Internet Explorer, Photoshop software etc on Linux or FreeBSD / PC-BSD.

Steven Edwards of the Bordeaux Technology Group released Bordeaux 2.0.0 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD today.

Bordeaux 2.0.0 marks major progress over older releases. With version 2.0.0 and onward Bordeaux Group are bundling their own Wine build and many tools and libraries that Wine depends upon. With this release Wine 1.1.36 is bundled, together with Cabextract, Mozilla Gecko, Unzip, Wget and other support libraries and tools.

Support for Microsoft Office 2007 (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) has impreved and preliminary support for Internet Explorer 7 is in this release. Many small bugs have been fixed and the back-end tweaked.

Supported Applications/Games:

  • Microsoft Office 2007
  • Microsoft Office 2003
  • Microsoft Office 2000
  • Microsoft Office 97
  • Microsoft Office Visio 2003
  • Microsoft Office Project 2003
  • Adobe Photoshop 6
  • Adobe Image Ready 3
  • Adobe Photoshop 7
  • Adobe Image Ready 7
  • Adobe Photoshop CS
  • Adobe Photoshop CS2
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6
  • Steam and Steam based Games
  • Apple QuickTime 6.5.2 Player
  • IrfaView 4.25 (Image files only)
  • Winetricks support

The program costs $20 and is available as i386 .sh installer or as PC-BSD PBI installer. If you have the patience and knowledge you can achieve almost the same with Wine, winetricks etc, but there’s nothing wrong taking the easy option.

Bordeaux for FreeBSD/PC-BSD Users |  Bordeaux for Linux Users

bordeaux wine windows software

The Bordeaux Technology Group is a software services and development company specializing in Windows compatibility software. Users of Linux systems from time to time find themselves in the need to run specialized Windows software. The Bordeaux suite enables access to these programs and data in a seamless and low cost manner without requiring licensing of Microsoft Technology.

Health Check: FreeBSD – “The unknown giant”

A piece of FreeBSD history advocacy on H-Online:

“FreeBSD is the most accessible and popular of the BSDs, has code at the heart of Darwin and Apple’s OS X, and has powered some of the more successful sites on the Web, including Hotmail, Netcraft and Yahoo!, which before the rise of Google was the busiest site on the internet.

FreeBSD rose from the ashes of 386BSD, the original effort to port BSD to the Intel chip, and claims a code lineage that reaches back to Bill Joy’s Berkeley Software Distribution of the late seventies. The 386BSD port was begun in 1989 by Bill and Lynne Jolitz, and was destined to be the original free Unix-like operating system for the IBM PC. The first public release of 386BSD (Version 0.0) was on St. Patrick’s Day, 1991, accompanied by a series of articles in Dr Dobbs journal, which documented the process.

The first functional release of 386BSD was Version 0.1, which was released on Bastille Day, 1992.

FreeBSD emerged in 1993, after the self-imposed task of supporting 386BSD on their own had proved too much for Bill and Lynne Jolitz. The patchkit which had been the underpinning for the BSD port to the 386 was revived and became the basis for the first FreeBSD release.”

More on h-online: Health Check: FreeBSD – “The unknown giant”

The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD (Book)

PC-BSD 8.0 is almost here, and so is The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD. This book is written by Dru Lavigne and due to be published later this month, 28 February.

Since its initial release in early 2006, the PC-BSD operating system has quickly become a popular desktop for both novice and experienced computer users. Novice users are initially amazed that such an attractive looking operating system is available for free. They quickly learn that it is also easy to use, free from viruses and spyware, provides the applications they need to perform their computing tasks, and has a large selection of additional software to choose from. Advanced users appreciate that it is built on top of FreeBSD, an operating system known for its security and stability, yet it still allows them to explore and tweak the system to meet their needs.

Pre-order on amazon: The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD

PC-BSD 8.0-RC Released

Only just realised I have forgotten to mention that PC-BSD 8.0RC was released.

Notable changes are:

  • FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE-P2
  • KDE 4.3.4
  • Brand new System Installer, allows the install of PC-BSD or FreeBSD
  • Run in Live mode directly from DVD
  • Updated Software Manager, allows browsing and installing applications directly
  • Support for 3D acceleration with NVIDIA drivers on amd64

The final version of PC-BSD 8.0 is not far off.

Benchmarking Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD

There has been an effort underway within the Debian development community to pull the FreeBSD kernel within this distribution to provide an alternative to using the Linux kernel. In essence with this Debian GNU/kFreeBSD project you have the standard Debian package set providing a GNU user-land with a GNU C library, but the FreeBSD kernel is running underneath. The Debian project has also been working on Debian GNU/Hurd to effectively do the same thing but with the GNU Mach microkernel. But unlike Debian GNU/Hurd, with the release of Debian 6.0 “Squeeze”, Debian GNU/kFreeBSD will reach a release status. With the Debian Squeeze release being just two months away we have decided to provide the first public set of benchmarks that compare the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD performance to that of Debian GNU/Linux. We have tested both the 32-bit and 64-bit builds of Debian with the Linux

More on Phoronix

Sponsoring FreeBSD

iX Systems has created a simple web based application for posting bounties, getting developers and sponsors on board, posting the committed code in a browser viewable format, and then handle final payout upon completion.

Source

I don’t know current the sponsorbsd website is, since the test projects are quite dated. Maybe Matt from iXsystems can leave a comment here when he reads this and give us an update on how current the website is.

It’s definitely a good idea, I think.