Comparative Introduction To FreeBSD For Linux Users

FreeBSD user anismaj explains FreeBSD to users of Linux that are looking to make the switch, or try out something new.

Original post:


BSD was originally derived from UNIX and currently, there are various number of Unix-like operating systems descended from the BSD. While, FreeBSD is the most widely used open source Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD distribution). As it is implicitly said it is a free and open source Unix-like-operating system and a public server platform. FreeBSD source code is generally released under a permissive BSD license. It is true that it has similarities with Linux but we cannot deny that they differs in other points.

The remainder of this article is organized as follows: the description of FreeBSD will be treated in our first section.  The similarities between FreeBSD and Linux will be briefly described in the second section. While their differences will be discussed in the third section. And a comparison of their features will be summarized in our last section.

FreeBSD description


  • The first version of FreeBSD was released in 1993, while its first CD-ROM distributed was FreeBSD1.0 on December 1993. Then, FreeBSD 2.1.0 was released in 1995 which gained the satisfaction of all users. Actually, many IT companies use FreeBSD and are satisfied where we can list those companies: IBM, Nokia, NetApp and Juniper Networks.


  • Concerning its license, FreeBSD is released under various source licenses. Its newest code called Kernel is released under the two-clause BSD license, offering the possibility to use and redistribute FreeBSD with absolute freedom. Other codes are released three- and four-clause BSD license and some others are released under GPL and CDDL.


  • One of the important feature of FreeBSD, we can mention the various categories of its users. In fact, it is possible to use FreeBSD as a mail server, web server, FTP server and as a router due to the significant set of server-related software accompanied with it. Furthermore, ARM, PowerPC and MIPS are supported by FreeBSD so it is possible to use x86 and s86-64.

FreeBSD and Linux similarities

[Read more…]

A look at the upcoming features for 10.1.2

pcbsd-logoSeveral upcoming features have been announced for PC-BSD 10.1.2. They are Personacrypt, Tor , stealth mode, LibreSSL, and encrypted backups. Read ahead for a detailed explanation for each.

Original post:

If you’ve been an EDGE user in the past few weeks, or following our Roadmap items for the upcoming 10.1.2 release, you may have noticed a number of new security and privacy related items. I wanted to take a moment to clarify what some of these new features are and what they will do.

– PersonaCrypt –

The first of the new features is a new CLI utility called personacrypt. This command will allow the creation and usage of a GELI backed encrypted external media for your users $HOME directory. We are using it internally to keep our user profiles on USB 3.0 — 256GB hybrid SSD / flash memory stick (Coarsair flash Voyager GTX specifically). This is tied into the PCDM login manager, and user manager, so when you create a new user account, you can opt to keep all your personal data on any external device. The device is formatted with GPT / GELI / ZFS, and is decrypted at login via the GUI, after entering your encryption key, along with the normal user password.

Additionally, the personacrypt command uses GELI’s ability to split the key into two parts. One being your passphrase, and the other being a key stored on disk. Without both of these parts, the media cannot be decrypted. This means if somebody steals the key and manages to get your password, it is still worthless without the system it was “paired” with. PersonaCrypt will also allow exporting / importing this key data, so you can “pair” the key with other systems.

– Tor Mode –

[Read more…]

FreeBSD Unix Find Out Which Programs Are Listing On a Given Port Number

openbsm-logo has posted yet another tutorial on how to see what programs are listed on a certain port on FreeBSD.

I’m a new FreeBSD Unix system user. How can I find out the process/programs names listing on a certain port on a FreeBSD Unix systems using command line? How do I lookup the process which is currently bound to the given network port on a FreeBSD server?

Tutorial details
Difficulty Easy (rss)
Root privileges Yes
Requirements none
Estimated completion time 5m

You can use any one of the following command-line tools that displays network connections, routing tables, and a number of network interface statistics on a FreeBSD operating systems.

  • netstat command – Use to see network status including open ports, tcp/udp connections, and more.
  • sockstat command – Show open sockets.
  • lsof command – List open files such as network sockets and files on disks.

FreeBSD has a command called sockstat and netstat tools. These are already on a standard FreeBSD install. You need to install the lsof tool from ports collection.

View the full tutorial here:

How to integrate Active Directory with FreeBSD 10.0 using security/sssd?

This tutorial by Vinícius Ferrão shows us how to integrate Active Directory with FreeBSD 10, using security/sssd.

Q: What are the required steps to authenticate users from an Active Directory running on Windows Server 2012 R2 in FreeBSD 10.0 using sssd with the AD backend with Kerberos TGT working?

A: There are some tricky considerations to make everything works out-of-the-box. FreeBSD only supports sssd version 1.9.6 at this moment. So there’s no support for   Enterprise Principal Names.

If you have a domain with non matched UPNs it will fail to login, since the Kerberos authentication will fail during the process, even with FreeBSD supporting Enterprise Principal Names with Kerberos, the sssd cannot handle this case.

So in actual version of sssd you are limited to have the User Principal Name within the same Domain Name, for example:

Domain Name =
User Principal Name: sAMAccountName: username

Knowing this we can describe the steps to successfully authenticate users from AD in FreeBSD.

View the full tutorial here:

Installing a Unix-Like Operating System FreeBSD 10.1 (+ Configuring Network)

This tutorial by shows us how to get FreeBSD 10.1 setup, including configuring the network interface.

FreeBSD is a Free Unix like operating system from Berkeley Software distribution, which is available for all major platforms x86_64, IA-32, POWERPC, ARM etc, and mainly focuses on features, speed, and performance stability.

FreeBSD 10.1 Installation GuideFreeBSD 10.1 Installation Guide

FreeBSD used by many top-level IT companies like Juniper Networks, NetApp, Nokia, IBM, etc. and available for server platforms with command line interface only, but we can use any other Desktop environments such as Xfce, KDE, GNOME etc. to make it user friendly distro.

My Environment Setup
IP Address	:
Hostname	:
Hard Disk	:	10GB
Memory		:	1GB

This article will walk you through the some brief instructions on installing FreeBSD 10.1 and configure network (setting static IP address) interfaces using a text-based installation utility named bsdinstall under i386 and AMD64 architectures.

View the full guide here:

FreeBSD Foundation February 2015 Update

freebsdfoundationThe FreeBSD Foundation’s February update consists of information on PCI Express Hot­Plug Project, FreeBSD on POWER8, FOSDEM ’15, an #InstallFreeBSD event, as well as fundraising updates.

As February comes to a close, I’m excited, not only because spring is
near, but because the Foundation has so many great things in the works
right now. From excellent progress on projects we’re supporting to
promoting FreeBSD at conferences, we’re working at full speed towards
meeting our 2015 goals. Be sure to check out the next installment of our
“From the Trenches” series and take time to find out how to get involved
in the upcoming #installFreeBSD fests. Each month, the support and
ideas that come from you, the FreeBSD community, remind me why we
work so hard to support such a vibrant and thriving community. Thank
you for all you do, and enjoy our latest update!


View the PDF here:

FreeBSD on the POWER8: it’s alive!

Adrian Chadd posts about Nathan Whitehorn’s findings on FreeBSD on POWER8.

A post to freebsd-ppc from a couple of vmonths ago asked if we had support for POWER8 and offered to provide remote access to anyone interested in working on it. I was sufficiently intrigued that I approached the FreeBSD powerpc hackers to ask about it, and was informed that it’d be nice, but we didn’t have hardware.

After a bit of wrangling of hardware logistics and with the FreeBSD Foundation purchasing a box, a Tyan POWER8 evaluation server appeared. Nathan Whitehorn started poking at it and managed to get a basic “hello world” going, but stalled on issues with the Linux KVM virtualisation environment.

Fast forward a few weeks – he’s figured out the KVM issues, their lack of support for some mandated hypervisor APIs and other bugs – FreeBSD now boots inside of the hypervisor environment and seems stable enough to do development on.

He then found the existing powerpc pmap (physical memory management) code wasn’t very SMP friendly – it works fine on one and two CPU powerpc machines, but this POWER8 evaluation board is a 4-core, 32-thread CPU. So a few days of development went by and he rewrote most of the pmap code to be much more fine grained locked and scale much, much better than the existing code. (He also found the PS3 hypervisor layer isn’t thread-safe.)

What’s been done thus far?
[Read more…]