BSD Magazine November 2014

BSD_11_2014-1

In this November issue of BSD Magazine, Tiago presents an article on how to use PPoE Concentrator Dual-Stack. Rob Somerville has articles on how to use GIMP, and the difference between geeks and nerds. In addition, Craig S. Wright shows us how to use 100+ UNIX commands, and Michael Ortega introduces Acunetix Web Vulnerability Scanner.

Download it from this link:

http://bsdmag.org/download/2896/

FreeBSD Foundation 2014 Year-End Fundraising Appeal

logo_freebsdfoundationDear FreeBSD community,
 
I’m writing to you today because I know you are passionate about FreeBSD. You care that it’s innovative, secure, stable, reliable, well engineered and documented, and loved.
 
For 14 years, the FreeBSD Foundation has been providing funding and support for the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide. We are fully funded by donations from people like you. That’s why I’m excited to tell you that we’ve kicked off our year-end fundraising campaign!
 
This has been an exciting time for the Foundation and FreeBSD community. As you may have heard, we kicked off this fundraiser with the largest donation we’ve ever received. Whether you are a developer, writer, advocate, organizer, user, or investor, this donation is a positive reflection on the work you are doing for FreeBSD…..

Read the rest of the announcement from Deb Goodkin here: http://freebsdfoundation.blogspot.com/2014/12/freebsd-foundation-2014-year-end.html

How to configure full disk encryption in PC-BSD 10.1

This article by LinuxBSDOS shows us how to configure full disk encryption in PC-BSD 10.1.

Disk partition of PC-BSD 10.1Full disk encryption is supported in the graphical installer of PC-BSD 10.1, which was released on November 16 and which I just reviewed just three days ago (see PC-BSD 10.1 review).

In this article, you’ll read how to install a default PC-BSD 10.1 system on a single hard drive with full disk encryption configured. The installation image I used is the same one I used for the review, which I transferred to a USB stick by using the dd command. You may download an installation image of PC-BSD 10.1 from here.

For this tutorial, the test computer is a recent build using a motherboard with UEFI firmware, and the target hard drive is a 500 GB unit. If you wish to follow along, boot into the installer, then click through the first few steps until you get to the step shown in Figure 1. Full disk encryption is not part of the configuration in a default installation of PC-BSD 10.1, so you’ll have to click on the Customize button.

Full article with instructions: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2014/11/27/how-to-configure-full-disk-encryption-in-pc-bsd-10-1/

ruBSD 2014 (13 December, Moscow)

ruBSD, a Russian technical BSD conference set up last year, will again take place this year on 13 December in Moscow.

The conference is free to attend, though registration is required as there are only a limited number of places.

The talks will be around highly loaded web servers, ZFS and iSCSI, package management, embedded-systems and IPv6 use in practice.

Among the presenters are Scott Long from Netflix, FreeBSD developer Baptiste Daroussin and Aleksandr Motin from iXsystems.

For more information visit the ruBSD 2014 event page.

8,000,000 Mogofoo-ops (BSD Now 65)

BSDNow.tv has uploaded another, weekly, video: 8,000,000 Mogofoo-ops (BSD Now 65).

“Coming up on the show this week, we’ve got an interview with Brendan Gregg of Netflix. He’s got a lot to say about performance tuning and benchmarks & even some pretty funny stories about how people have done them incorrectly.”

To view a summary of what Kris Moore and Alan Jude chat about or for other audio/video formats visit the BSD Now 65 page on Jupiter Broadcasting or click here for the youtube link.

64-bit ARM architecture project update

logo_freebsdfoundationIn this month’s project update we will take a look at the ongoing FreeBSD 64-bit ARM port. AArch64 is the official name for the 64-bit ARM architecture, but it is also known as ARMv8 and arm64. The 64-bit ARM architecture is expected to find use in traditional server markets, in contrast to the embedded and mobile markets where 32-bit ARM is widely adopted.

The FreeBSD Foundation is collaborating with ARM, Cavium, Semihalf and Andrew Turner to port FreeBSD to arm64. Cavium is contributing directly to the Foundation, supplying engineering expertise and hardware for the development community. Cavium’s ThunderX platform provides a great match for FreeBSD’s strength as a server operating system, and it supports up to 48 cores in a single package. ThunderX will be the initial reference target for this project, but ports to other arm64 platforms are expected later on.

Read the full announcement here: http://freebsdfoundation.blogspot.com/2014/11/64-bit-arm-architecture-project-update.html

Building and Installing custom kernel in FreeBSD-10

This post by Free and Open Source Software Knowledge Base shows us how to build and install a custom kernel in FreeBSD-10.

Go to the kernel source directory which contains the configurations.

cd /usr/src/sys/amd64/conf

Create a folder named kernel in the home directory of root user i.e. /root.

mkdir /root/kernels

Create a soft link in the /usr/src/sys/amd64/conf named “MYKERNEL” which links to /root/kernels/MYKERNEL file.

cp GENERIC /root/kernels/MYKERNEL
ln -s /root/kernels/MYKERNEL

Goto the folder created above.

cd /root/kernels/

Edit the file “MYKERNEL” and make the following change. This line helps us to create the new kernel which is a combination of a generic kernel and the extra features added. The following line includes the features available in a generic kernel

include         GENERIC

The other additional lines specify the features to be added in the kernel to be created.
For Example:

cpu             HAMMER
ident           GENERIC

makeoptions     DEBUG=-g                # Build kernel with gdb(1) debug symbols
makeoptions     WITH_CTF=1              # Run ctfconvert(1) for DTrace support

options         SCHED_ULE               # ULE scheduler
options         PREEMPTION              # Enable kernel thread preemption
options         INET                    # InterNETworking
options         INET6                   # IPv6 communications protocols
options         TCP_OFFLOAD             # TCP offload
options         SCTP                    # Stream Control Transmission Protocol
options         FFS                     # Berkeley Fast Filesystem
options         SOFTUPDATES             # Enable FFS soft updates support
options         UFS_ACL                 # Support for access control lists
options         UFS_DIRHASH             # Improve performance on big directories
options         UFS_GJOURNAL            # Enable gjournal-based UFS journaling
options         QUOTA                   # Enable disk quotas for UFS
options         MD_ROOT                 # MD is a potential root device

To build a file which contains all available options, run the following commands.

cd /usr/src/sys/amd64/conf
make LINT

Goto the main source folder.

cd /usr/src

Build and Install the new kernel with reference from the file “MYKERNEL”.

make buildkernel KERNCONF=MYKERNEL
make installkernel KERNCONF=MYKERNEL

Now reboot the machine to boot into the new kernel you just created now.

Original post: https://fosskb.wordpress.com/2014/11/20/building-and-installing-custom-kernel-in-freebsd-10/